Eating Healthy on a Budget

In the Western Hemisphere, it used to be that being overweight was a sign of wealth. These days, the processed food chain is run like a (very) well-oiled machine, serving up cheap products to the masses – products generally high in fat and salt, but low in nutritional value. Now, obesity is generally considered a sign of low-income and poor education.

To add insult to injury, affording the healthcare and insurance that the well-off consider basic elements of familial security is beyond many of the people who need it most. Getting a good insurance policy is as vital to protecting your family as encouraging them to heat more healthily. Try looking online for a range of policy options, including mortgage insurance.

Once you have the basic financial protection in place, you can concentrate on saving money on your monthly food bill. If you can summon the strength to disregard the bombardment of advertising and marketing tricks employed by Big Food, it’s easy to change your diet for the better, and save money whilst adding years to your life. It’s time to bid goodbye to low budgets being an excuse for unhealthy living…

The number one piece of advice for healthier (and cheaper) living is to give up, or reduce your intake of alcohol. Apart from being high in calories, the health risks associated with drinking are well documented. Many people who consider themselves of below-average wealth think nothing of spending a hundred quid a week on booze. Drinking also tends to increase appetite, so you find yourself eating more than you would sober. Try to limit drinking to a Friday or Saturday night – but don’t binge!

The same goes for junk food. Even people who eat it all the time happily refer to it as such. But why put ‘junk’ in your body at all? Ok, a starchy, fatty treat can sometimes be just the reward you think you need after a hard day, but the experience is generally followed by regret and bellyache. Try giving up gluten. You’ll find this cuts out most of your junk food options, and it’s an easy, singular rule to follow. You’ll feel better, lose weight, and save money.

Remember to drink lots of water – 8 glasses a day is recommended for a healthy system. And variety is key, so try to mix up your diet. There are a number of fruit and veg delivery companies out there who will bring a different selection to your door each week. Having it delivered stops you spending money on impulse purchases at the supermarket, and also brings items you would never consider eating. Look online for ways to prepare that unfamiliar bok choy or sweet potato. It’ll be a challenge for you to use new ingredients, and you’ll make fewer unnecessary trips to the shops.

 

 

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1 Comment

  1. Aubrey West @ Eating Healthy on a Budget
    July 24, 2012 / 8:53 am

    Nice and great ideas author! Saving money is quite difficult, eating healthy on a budget must be practice.

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